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2 edition of cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource-based view found in the catalog.

cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource-based view

Margaret A. Peteraf

cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource-based view

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Published by [S.N.] in [S.L.] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Taken from: Strategic management journal,Vol 14 Pages 179-191, 1993.

StatementMargaret A. Peteraf.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19262226M

Competitive heterogeneity is a concept from strategic management that examines why industries do not converge on one best way of doing things. In the view of strategic management scholars, the microeconomics of production and competition combine to predict that industries will be composed of identical firms offering identical products at identical prices.


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cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource-based view by Margaret A. Peteraf Download PDF EPUB FB2

Abstract This paper elucidates the underlying economics of the resource‐based view of competitive advantage and integrates existing perspectives into a parsimonious model of resources and firm performance.

The essence of this model is that four conditions underlie sustained competitive advantage, all of which must be by: This paper elucidates the underlying economics of the resource-based view of competitive advantage and integrates existing perspectives into a parsimonious model of resources and firm performance.

The essence of this model is that four conditions underlie sustained competitive advantage, all of which must be met. The goal of strategy is sustained competitive advantage and Margaret Peteraf attempts to use the resource-based view of the firm (RBV) (see Wernerfelt's () A resource-based view of the firm) to provide an alternative model of how firms achieve sustainable competitive advantage.

This paper elucidates the underlying economics of the resource-based view of competitive advantage and integrates existing perspectives into a parsimonious model of resources and firm performance. The essence of this model is that four conditions underlie sustained competitive advantage, all of which must be met.

These include superior resources (heterogeneity within an industry), ex post. The cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource‐based view The cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource‐based view Peteraf, Margaret A.

- THE CORNERSTONES OF COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE: A RESOURCE-BASED VIEW MARGARET A. PETERAF J. Kellogg Graduate School of Management, Northwestern University, Evansron, Illinois. Peteraf, M. () The Cornerstones of Competitive Advantage A Resource-Based View.

Strategic Management Journal, 14, Summary of “The cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource-based view” 方方方 Citation Peteraf, M.A. “The Cornerstones of Competitive Advantage: A Resource-based View.” Strategic Management Journal Keywords Resources; rents; competitive advantage; single-business strategy; corporate strategy Summary This paper elucidates the underlying economics of.

The 'Resource-Based View of the Firm' has emerged over the last fifteen years as one of the dominant perspectives used in strategic management. It addresses the fundamental research question of strategic management: Why it is that some firms persistently outperform others?Resource-Based Theory provides a considered overview of this theory, including the latest developments, from one of the key /5(2).

The Resource Based View (RBV) takes an ‘inside-out’ view or firm-specific perspective on why organizations succeed or fail in the market place.

According to. Penrose's () resources approach is concerned with efficiency, economic profit, competitive advantage, and profitable growth. These are the cornerstones of a resource‐based view. [6] Margie Peteraf () “The cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource-based view,” Strategic Management Journal, – [7] Jay B.

Barney () “Firm resources and sustained competitive advantage,” Journal of Management, 99 – The 'Resource-Based View of the Firm' has emerged over the last fifteen years as one of the dominant perspectives used in strategic management.

It addresses the fundamental research question of strategic management: Why it is that some firms persistently outperform others?Resource-Based Theory provides a considered overview of this theory, including the latest developments, from one of the key.

The resource based view of the firm suggests that an organization’s human capital management practices can contribute significantly to sustaining competitive advantage by creating specific knowledge, skills and culture within the firm that are difficult to. In Resource Based viewpoint theory (RBV), the resources possessed by a firm are the primary determinants of its performance.

The resources may remain latent until the firm deploy its capabilities. Abstract. Corporate strategy refers to the decisions of a firm’s top management concerning the scope of the firm, in terms of its geographic and product markets, as well as the degree of vertical ate strategy defines the firm in terms of the extent of its international activities, the degree of vertical integration, and the diversity of the product markets in which it competes.

Abstract. This chapter addresses the resource-based view (RBV) of global operations strategy. We first discuss resources of a firm, investigate the relationship between resource and competitive advantages, present RBV theory in the field of strategic management, and introduce concepts in resource-based global operations strategy.

The opening chapter has introduced the field of talent management, its evolution, and the core practices it involves. In this chapter we take the resource-based view (RBV) of the firm and use it as a lens to explore and critique talent-management practices.

The cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource-based view. Strategic Management Journal, – Google Scholar; Pfeffer J. Competitive advantage through people: Unleashing the power of the workforce.

Boston: Harvard Business School Press. Google Scholar; Prahalad C. K., Hamel G. The core competence of the corporation. The objective of this paper is to incorporate the entrepreneurial view point into the framework of the resource-based view of strategic management.

We firstly attempt to make a brief survey of the conceptual framework of the RBV, and formulize it in a static sense by contrasting it with the competitive forces approach. Secondly, we conduct a critical assessment of the RBV from a dynamic point. The resource-based view (RBV) is a managerial framework used to determine the strategic resources a firm can exploit to achieve sustainable competitive advantage.

Barney's article "Firm Resources and Sustained Competitive Advantage" is widely cited as a pivotal work in the emergence of the resource-based view. However, some scholars argue that there was evidence for a fragmentary.

Book. Ansoff, H. I., MacDonnell, E. and Harvey-Jones, J. The cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource-based view - Strategic Management Journal. In The cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource-based view.

Strategic Management Journal, 14(3), pp Journal. Porter, M. THE FIVE COMPETITIVE FORCES THAT SHAPE. Thus the resource-based view builds around a framework first conceived by Kenneth R.

Andrews in his classic book The Concept of “The Cornerstones of Competitive Advantage. There are two basic types of competitive advantage: cost leadership and differentiation. This book describes how a firm can gain a cost advantage or how it can differentiate itself. It describes how the choice of competitive scope, or the range of a firm's activities, can play a powerful role in determining competitive advantage.

Peteraf, M.A. () The Cornerstones of Competitive Advantage: A Resource-Based View. has been cited by the following article: TITLE: Competitiveness of Togolese Banking Sector.

AUTHORS: Tunde Ahmed Afolabi. KEYWORDS: Competitiveness, Banking Sector, SCP Framework. Thus, in the theory of the resource-based view, competitive advantage is embedded within an organization.

In order to join the perspective of value-questioning (e.g. [9]) and value-affirmation (e.g. [19]), we draw upon both theories: Porter’s theory [15] of positioning informs our understanding of how value creation supports the generic. The Cornerstones of Competitive Advantage: A Resource-Based View (Margaret Peteraf, ) Group 1 Meredith, Barclay, Woo-je, and Kumar Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising.

This article discusses the creation of economic competitive advantages in poor counties. The article discusses and analyzes different paths of gaining.

First labeled by Wernerfelt and developed through a series of papers by various authors, the resource-based view of the firm (RBV) explains how firms achieve competitive advantage and economic rents through ownership and management of assets, capabilities, knowledge, and similar internal ce-based theory is complementary to more outward-looking theories of competitive advantage.

An assessment of resource-based theorizing on firm growth and suggestions for the future. Journal of Management, 44(1), Nelson, R.R.

& Winter, G. An evolutionary theory of economic change. Harvard Business School Press, Cambridge. Peteraf, M. The cornerstones of competitive advantage: A resource-based view.

Explaining the competitive advantage of logistics service providers: A resource-based view approach. International Journal of Production Economics, (1), 51– World Economic Forum. Introduction. Although strategy-as-practice research has thrived during the last decade, the resource-based view (RBV: Barney ; Peteraf ; Wernerfelt ) and capabilities perspectives (Dosi, Nelson and Winter ; Eisenhardt and Martin ; Winter ) have continued to dominate mainstream strategic management research.

[1] The resource-based view (RBV) as a basis for the competitive advantage of a firm lies primarily in the application of a bundle of valuable tangible or intangible resources at the firm's disposal (Mwailu & Mercer, p, Wernerfelt,p; Rumelt,p; Penrose, [2]).To transform a short-run competitive advantage into a sustained competitive advantage requires that.

Resource-Based View According to resource-based theory, organizations that own “strategic resources” have important competitive advantages over organizations that do not. Some resources, such as cash and trucks, are not considered to be strategic resources because an organization’s competitors can readily acquire them.

Summary of resource based view is that firm can only have a sustained competitive advantage if it is implementing a value creating strategy not simultaneously being implemented by any current or potential competitors and controls its physical, human or organisational resources that are valuable, rare, inimitable and non-substitutable.

Historically, management theory has ignored the constraints imposed by the biophysical (natural) environment. Building upon resource-based theory, this article attempts to fill this void by proposing a natural-resource-based view of the firm—a theory of competitive advantage based upon the firm's relationship to the natural environment.

It is composed of three interconnected strategies. The Resource-based view of the firm could also be described as: a) The outside-in approach. b) An organization has competitive advantage in the markets in which it competes but its culture is rather inwards looking and complacent. In this situation it is unlikely that competitive advantage will be: About the book.

Find out more, read a. Over the last two decades, the resource-based view (RBV) has become dominant in the strategic management field.

It has often been observed that the RBV is lacking in the dynamic dimension. For example, processes of building competitive advantages by means of combining existing complementary resources in novel ways are not inquired into.

Resource-based views of competitive strategy Assignment for part-time MBA Competitive Strategies, week 3By Gulcin Askin, Michelle Donovan, Kivanc Ozuolmez and Peter Tempelman Septem 2.

The reasons for differences in performance of firms in the same industry have been subject toresearch for more than fifty years. The results suggest that while tangible IT resources offer little competitive advantage, intangible IT resources are positively associated with IT capabilities that ultimately lead to IT competitive advantage and the improved financial performance of the organization.

strategic-management-and-competitive-advantage-4th-edition 1/6 Downloaded from on Decem by guest [Book] Strategic Management And Competitive Advantage 4th Edition Recognizing the quirk ways to acquire this books strategic management and competitive advantage 4th edition is additionally useful.

Books and journals Case studies Expert Briefings Open Access. The second model used is the resource-based view approach to business environmental analysis. “ The cornerstones of competitive advantage: a resource-based view ”.

The central proposition of the resource based view is that, for a firm to a achieve a state of sustained competitive advantage, it must acquire and control valuable, rare, inimitable and non-substitutable (VRIN) resources and capabilities, plus have the organization (O) in .A book by Roger Martin and A.G Lafley, Playing to win would assist the authors in removing their define strategy as an intergrated set of choices that uniquely positions the firm in its industry so as to create sustainable advantage and superior value relative to the competition.